Do Facial Fractures Heal On Their Own?

What doctor treats facial fractures?

Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are trained, skilled and uniquely qualified to manage and treat facial trauma.

Injuries to the face, by their very nature, impart a high degree of physical, as well as emotional, trauma..

How are facial fractures treated?

Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is surgery to help keep the bones from moving while they heal. Wires, screws, or plates are used to join broken facial bones. Reconstructive surgery may be needed to fix damaged areas of your face.

What happens if a fracture is left untreated?

When a bone fracture is untreated, it can result in either a nonunion or a delayed union. In the former case, the bone doesn’t heal at all, which means that it will remain broken. As a result, swelling, tenderness, and pain will continue to worsen over time.

Can a fractured cheekbone heal without surgery?

Cheekbone fractures usually heal without infection but it may be necessary to give you antibiotics, particularly if a “graft” has been used.

Do all facial fractures require surgery?

If you break a bone in your face, you may have minor problems or major problems. The bones affect breathing, eating and speaking. You may need surgery to get back to normal. It’s important to contact your doctor immediately if you think you have facial fractures.

What is the most common fracture of the face?

Probably the most common facial fracture is the tripod or zygomaticomaxillary complex fracture, so called because it involves separation of all three major attachments of the zygoma to the rest of the face.

Can facial bones move?

Facial bones shift and wither with time, too. CT images showing the differences in angle and length in the lower jaw of a young female (left) and an older female (right). “We saw changes around the eye, and then in the cheek area and in the jaw,” says Langstein. “And if you think about it, it kind of makes sense.

What is a facial doctor called?

Dermatologists are skin care doctors who have expertise in the care of normal skin, and in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the skin, hair, and nails. In addition, dermatologists are knowledgeable in the management of cosmetic disorders of the skin (such as hair loss and scars).

How is a maxillary fracture treated?

Maxillary fractures are treated by reduc- tion and immobilization. Establishment of preinjury occlusion and midface buttress alignment provides the foundation for this treatment. The goals of treatment of LeFort fractures are to reestablish preinjury occlusion with normal height and projection of the face.

How long does it take for a facial fracture to heal?

How long it takes a facial fracture to heal will depend on the type and extent of fracture and what other problems and treatment you had. Bruising and swelling usually takes 2 to 3 weeks to settle down. At this point, you will begin to look more normal. After this time the body will continue to heal itself inside.

What are the symptoms of a broken cheekbone?

Symptoms of Cheekbone FracturesPain, tenderness, and swelling.A flat appearance to the face.Vision problems.Blood in the side of the eye (on the affected side)Jaw pain, specifically when jaw is moved.Numbness under the eye of the injured side.

How do they fix a fractured cheekbone?

Once you are under the anaesthetic the cheekbone will be repositioned into the correct place. This usually involves a small incision about an inch long through the hair in the temple. Sometimes this is all that is required. Your surgeon may insert small metal plates and screws to hold it in place.

Can I fly with a fractured cheekbone?

If you break a bone while you’re on holiday, or immediately before, your airline may require you to wait for at least 24 hours (48 hours for flights over two hours) before you fly. Swelling is common after a fracture and at best, swelling can cause pain and discomfort, especially during a long -haul flight.

How do you know if your eye socket is fractured?

Symptoms of eye socket fracture include:double vision or reduced vision.swelling of the eyelid.pain, bruising, tearing, or bleeding around the eye.nausea and vomiting (most common in trapdoor fractures)sunken or bulging eye, or droopy eyelid.inability to move your eye in some directions.